Archive for the ‘Talent’ Category


How Good Is Kelly Hunter?

An editor at a sports publication asked me to share where I thought Kelly Hunter fit in among the great atheletes who have competed for Nebraska. This is my response:
Hello xxxxxxx,
I think exercises like this are somewhat foolish for several reasons. You can’t compare a setter with competitors in other sports or even other positions in volleyball. Who was the better baseball player, Bob Gibson or Ted Williams? It’s the type of question suitable for those kids walking along the railroad track in the movie Stand by Me.
Karen Dahlgren, Allison Weston, Greicha Cepero,  Sarah Pavan and Christina Houghtelling were National players of the Year and Jordan Larson was  as good or better than many of them. If there was a better middle blocker in 2000 than Amber Holmquist I didn’t see her. Justine Wong-Orantes was so good at the libero position in 2016 because she had the unique ability to be out of postion at the right time. (Read that sentence again until you understand it.)
 
I can only compare Kelly with other setters and that is a special group. Lori Endacott was named Best Setter in the World in the Barcelona Olympics but the two teams she was the starting setter for at Nebraska were not top five teams. Until another Husker setter is named Best in the World, Endacott is the best setter we have produced at Nebraska.
 
Christy Johnson was a first team All-American her junior and senior years and led her teams to a 63-2 record, never lost an away match, and was captain of Nebraska’s first national championship team. She also averaged close to 14 assists per set prior to rally score.
Cathy Noth Was MVP of the Big 8 Conference two times as a hitter and two times as a setter. She then went on to play with the US National Team as a setter. Fiona Nepo was a three time All-American and perhaps one the three most athletic setters for Nebraska Volleyball. Fiona set two Finals fours and played backrow defense in a third. Greichaly Cepero was National Player of the Year when she led Nebraska to a National Championship in 2000. I could go with others like Val Novak, Nikki Stricker, Tisha Delaney, Lauren Cook, and Rachael Holloway but here is the best thing that I can say. Each of these players, including Kelly, was the best person for their teams.
 
There is a saying in volleyball. “One average setter and five good hitters makes five average hitters. One great setter and five good hitters makes five great hitters.” 
 
If there was a National 5-1 Setter of the year award Endacott, Johnson, Novak, Nepo, Cepero, Holloway and Hunter would have had a good chance to win the award. Noth played in a 6-2 so she wouldn’t have been considered but she was certainly one of the best six rotation players her senior year.  
 
What I can comment on, is what Kelly Hunter does best. Her best attributes are her mindset and her decision making. Mindset is the ability to not pass judgment on the last behavior (set). Like all great setters she may occasionally underset a ball or make a decision that wasn’t the best, but she doesn’t let a less than great play impact the next play. She is passionate but not emotional. She is intentional in her decision making rather than reactionary. She also does the most important thing for any great setter, she sets hittable balls. I thought she was the best setter in 2017. 
 
So here is the truth. Kelly Hunter is an extraordinary competitor which puts her in an exclusive club of other great players for Nebraska Volleyball. Anyone who can rate those players from 1 thru 20, has either not been watching Nebraska Volleyball for the last 40 years or has better judgement that I do.   
 
Thank you, 
 
Terry Pettit
 

My Take on Nebraska Football — Terry Pettit

         Nebraska has fired the Athletic Director twice at mid-season in the past decade, and in both cases the football teams’ performance only got worse during the second half of the season.

There might have been more integrity in firing the head football coach, which would have given those teams the opportunity to prove the administration was wrong. It surely would have been fairer to the head football coaches, who were left playing a game of chutes and ladders with only one dice. But it is more complicated than that.

In 2007 the morale was so low in the UNL athletic department it had to be done. Coaches throughout the department were on the verge of leaving because of autocratic leadership that appeared to be soulless.

2017 is different. The current football staff seems to have lost the team in the last two weeks. Despite that observation, the current staff also appears to have attracted a number of high level recruits who might  chang their minds if Riley is fired prior to the December 20 signing date. The administration didn’t trust the former A.D. to hire the right person because he didn’t get it right the first time. But if they got another A.D. in place who could hire the right coach, they could fire Riley at the end of the season or at least after December 20. This is the contemporary version of having your cake and eating it to. If Nebraska’s slide continues, the new Athletic Director, Bill Moos, may be forced to fire Riley before the early singing date.

It takes a lot of hard work, talent and luck to get to the place that Nebraska football was at in the mid-90s. It also takes a lot of questionable decisions, administrative indifference, and a lack of collaboration by a lot of people for Nebraska football to get to where it is today. But if anyone has a right to be angry it should be the players who have not been put in a position to reach their potential as a team for almost twenty years.

One former head coach had never been a collegiate head coach or coordinator.

(Please do not use Tom Osborne as an example of someone who did not have head coaching experience but had great success. Tom Osborne was the defacto head coach of Nebraska football during the Devaney’s championship seasons.)

One had not had success in the college game. One led with his amygdala, and one was a good man who lacked the edge to create the toughness it takes to build a championship team in this environment.

When I was hired at Nebraska in 1977, Coach Osborne’s base salary was about $40,000. Mine was $12,000, so you could say I was overpaid. I don’t like the millions of dollars that are paid to power five football and basketball coaches, but whether or not I like it is not the point.

If you want to be competitive and hire a coach that gives you the chance to be competitive for several years, you have to pay more than the competition. The competition includes schools like Ohio State, Alabama, Georgia and others who are paying outrageous salaries.

I also don’t believe you have to be 55 to be a great football coach. I trust my life to pilots under forty, and a stock brokers under thirty-five. Right now, I could get pretty enthusiastic about a President under fifty.

Nebraska needs to take a risk if it is going to return to being competitive. What you don’t risk is character. That’s a deal breaker. But it is really not as complicated as it looks. John Cook won the Big Ten Conference before he became the Nebraska head volleyball coach. Tom Osborne won two national championships before he became Nebraska’s head football coach.

To win at Nebraska you need to have had success as college head football coach. You need to be on the upside of your career. You need to be a good fit, but most importantly you need to have shown that you can win and win again. You need to be extraordinary.

–Terry Pettit